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Spotless Technology(Shenzhen)Co.,Ltd
Web: www.sptsclean.com/cn.sptsclean.com

Factory Address:
Add: Zhangbei Yongchanglong Industrial Zone, Ailian Village, Longgang District, Shenzhen, China
Post code: 518172
Tel: +86-755-89598011/89598022
Fax: +86-755-89598033

 

Steven Xi
Telephone: +86 755 28999893
Mobile: +86 13827465388
Email: info@hk-lord.com

Vacuum Cleaner -- II

The vacuum cleaner evolved from the carpet sweeper via manual vacuum cleaners. The first manual models, using bellows, were developed in the 1860s, and the first motorized designs appeared at the turn of the 20th century, with the first decade being the boom decade.

Booth created a large device, driven by an internal combustion engine. Nicknamed the "Puffing Billy”, Booth’s first petrol-powered, horse-drawn vacuum cleaner relied upon air drawn by a piston pump through a cloth filter. It did not contain any brushes; all the cleaning was done by suction through long tubes with nozzles on the ends. Although the machine was too bulky to be brought into the building, its principles of operation were essentially the same as the vacuum cleaners of today. He followed this up with an electric-powered model, but both designs were extremely bulky, and had to be transported by horse and carriage. The term "vacuum cleaner" was first used by the company set up to market Booth's invention, in its first issued prospectus of 1901.

Booth initially did not attempt to sell his machine, but rather sold cleaning services. The vacuums of the British Vacuum Cleaner Company (BVCC) were bright red; uniformed operators would haul hose off the vacuum and route it through the windows of a building to reach all the rooms inside. Booth was harassed by complaints about the noise of his vacuum machines and was even fined for frightening horses.[citation needed] Gaining the royal seal of approval, Booth's motorized vacuum cleaner was used to clean the carpets of Westminster Abbey prior to Edward VII's coronation in 1901. The device was used by the Royal Navy to improve the level of sanitation in the naval barracks. It was also used in businesses such as theatres and shops, although the device was too large to be feasibly used as a domestic appliance.

Booth received his first patents on 18 February and 30 August 1901. Booth started the BVCC and refined his invention over the next several decades. Though his "Goblin" model lost out to competition from Hoover in the household vacuum market, his company successfully turned its focus to the industrial market, building ever-larger models for factories and warehouses. Booth's company, now BVC, lives on today as a unit of pneumatic tube system maker Quire pace Ltd.

The American industry was established by the New Jersey inventor David T. Kenney between 1903 and 1913. Membership in the Vacuum Cleaner Manufacturers' Association, formed in 1919, was limited to licensees under his patents.